EXIT The Game: The Mysterious Museum

Markus Brand, Inka Brand, Ralph Querforth

Publisher: Kosmos

What is up with creepy museums at night? (Photo credits: Eric Martin@BGG)

SPOILER ALERT: DO NOT READ THIS IF YOU WANT TO PLAY THE GAME.

There are plenty of reviews of this game out there that are spoiler free. This is not it. I am going to directly discuss about the game and the puzzles. You have been warned!!

The Mysterious Museum is the second game in the series I have played. Abandoned Cabin being the first. Overall, I still enjoy the EXIT series very much. Rather than being mysterious about my reviews, I am going to directly discuss the clues and puzzles and how they match up with previous series. We played with 2 players in this game and overall, found the game relatively easy. We finished the game in 91 minutes with 3 hints, but basically, we were hung up on two technicalities and nothing to do with the difficulty of the puzzles. The puzzles while easy, felt uneven. Some were good, most were mediocre and a few were slightly frustrating.

The theme of Mysterious Museum is that you are suddenly locked in the museum featuring a Da Vinci time machine that was recently uncovered. As you hop on the time machine going back in time, you solve puzzles associated with Einstein, Curie and Da Vinci in the museum itself. Finally, you zip into the future, solve a mystery and then back to the present where the door mysteriously unlocks after the final puzzle is solve. The time machine is then drained and destroyed.

Puzzle highlights:

  • The triangle puzzle was good. We immediately knew to orient the ticket based on the green brackets but didn’t realize you had to tear the stubs. Cute. That the ticket also gave numbers without tearing stubs was a great herring. Nice
  • The infinity puzzle was frustrating. The page provided very few clues except to fold the riddle. Which was fine, but the numbers on the riddle card wasn’t very clear.
  • The square puzzle was neat. The numbers from three discovered were mashed up or collasped to find the code. That was cool, and relatively easy . Still pretty cool
  • The hexagon puzzles instructs you to tie two pieces of string at two ends and spin the “tot” board rapidly to find the code. It was pretty obvious that you have to do that and I don’t think the instructions had to be so explicit. Too easy.
  • The “Y” puzzle was also easy since a similar clue appeared in another EXIT game. You had to look at the game box for clue. It was printed on the sides.
  • The Star puzzle was a bit lame. Just an activity where you follow instructions in placement.
  • The diamond puzzle was ok. You just had to spot the numbers in the newly cut and reassembled image.
  • I did not like the “L” puzzle for one reason: it was a “western” oriented clue in that a person needs to know that a Rooster made a “Cock-a-doodle-doo” sound. Come on. Most Asian countries don’t think a rooster makes that sound.
  • They saved the final circle puzzle for the best. I knew something was special about the decoder disc. The final clue was a deadringer and I knew immediately it had something to do with the DISC as was stated in the clue. The disc had glow in the dark properties and in the dark, you could clear see a patter on the wheel. Pretty neat.

Hangups:

  • The clues were too easy most of the time. Granted this is a 2/5 start difficulty game, but the Tot wheel gave you precise instruction on what to do with the item. Even came with illustrations. The final clue had too many not-so-subtle hints. Come on now
  • The Cock-a-doodle-doo puzzle was silly and very skewed .
  • Felt that a lot of the puzzles were just activities that we were instructed to do. There was no mystery at all.

I’d say overall it as a fun experience, especially with two. I think the puzzles were a shade too easy and I think the heavier ones in the EXIT series might be better for us. Looking forward to those.

Initial impressions: Good

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